Category: Drug Testing News

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Hawaii Becomes the 26th State to Decriminalize Marijuana

On Tuesday July 9, 2019 the State of Hawaii, under the new legislation HI measure 1383 became law without the signature of Hawaii Governor David Ige.  This new bill will take effect on January 11, 2020 which removes any jail time associated with marijuana possession of 3 grams or less and now individuals will face a fine of $130.

Additional penalties outlined in this bill include Possession of more than 3 grams, but less than 1 ounce of marijuana is a petty misdemeanor punishable by up to 30 days imprisonment and/or a fine of $1,000.

Possession of 1 ounce or more but less than 1 pound is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1-year imprisonment and/or a $2,000 fine.  Possession of 1 pound or more, of marijuana is a Class C felony punishable by up to 5 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $10,000.

Governor David Ige declined to sign the legislation but also didn’t veto it by Tuesday’s deadline.

States with Marijuana Decriminalization

The following states have passed laws either fully or partially decriminalizing certain marijuana possession offenses. Usually, decriminalization means no arrest, prison time, or criminal record for the first-time possession of a small amount of marijuana for personal consumption.

In most decriminalized states, these offenses are treated like a minor traffic violation.

Additionally, over 50 localities in about a dozen states have enacted municipal laws or resolutions either fully or partially decriminalizing minor cannabis possession offenses.

* Voters in each of these jurisdictions have subsequently approved legislation legalizing the adult use and personal cultivation of cannabis.

** These states have partially decriminalized certain marijuana possession offenses. Although the law still classifies marijuana possession offenses as criminal, the offenses do not carry any threat of jail time.

*** North Dakota’s law takes effect on August 1, 2019.

**** Hawaii’s law takes effect on January 11, 2020.

How does marijuana legalization effect employers?

Employers regulated by Federal law (DOT, HHS, Federal Drug Free Workplace Act) are still required to test for the Standard Federal 5 panel drug test which currently screens for the following drugs.

  • Marijuana (THC)
  • Cocaine
  • Amphetamines
  • Opioids
  • Phencyclidine (PCP)

Under ‘Opioids’, previously ‘Opiates’, DOT testing will continue to include confirmatory testing, when appropriate, for Codeine, Morphine, and 6-AM (heroin). 

HHS also added initial and confirmatory testing for the semi-synthetic opioids Hydrocodone, Hydromorphone, Oxycodone, and Oxymorphone to this Opioids group.  Some brand names for the semi-synthetic opioids include OxyContin®, Percodan®, Percocet®, Vicodin®, Lortab®, Norco®, Dilaudid®, Exalgo®.

 Non-Regulated Employers

In most states employers still reserve the right to be a drug free workplace regardless of specific State or local municipalities laws regarding recreational and/or medical marijuana.  We recommend that each employer review their drug free workplace policy and any specific State, local or case law that may impact testing for a marijuana prior to implementing a drug free workplace policy/program.

What Employers Can Do?

  • Create a culture of safety for your employees, customers and community
  • Research any State, local or case law that may impact your drug free workplace policy to ensure compliance
  • Update your workplace drug & alcohol policy, making sure it is clear on violations and consequences.
  • Your policy should include all forms of drug & alcohol testing that you intend to use.
  • Employees company-wide must be made aware of the workplace drug & alcohol policies and procedures. This is an on-going conversation that should occur on a regular basis.
  • Enforce your policies consistently and fairly.

For more information regarding establishing a drug free workplace policy call us today!

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Alcohol In A Urine Test

Alcohol testing unlike most drugs, has a much shorter detection window. A urine drug test can screen for ethanol, which is the type of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages, up to 12 hours. However, there are some types of urine tests that can identify alcohol byproducts for up 72 hours after the person’s last drink, but those tests can have significant limitations.

The vast majority of alcohol, about 90-95% is broken down by the liver. A small amount is expelled through someone’s breath and sweat. The remaining 1-2% is excreted in urine.  Alcohol usually shows up in a someone’s urine within an hour of consuming alcohol and it remains detectable for up to 12 hours. However, the time frame can vary depending on different factors such as, weight, health, gender and the amount of alcohol consumed.

The alcohol in urine testing can sometimes be used to estimate a person’s blood alcohol content. The amount of urine alcohol is approximately 1.33 times more than the amount of alcohol in their bloodstream. For more accuracy, at least two urine samples are  usually collected 30 minutes to an hour apart.  

Byproducts of Alcohol in Urine

Alcohol in a urine test does have a relatively short detection time, however certain byproducts remain in the body longer. One of these byproducts are EtG (ethyl glucuronide) can be detected in urine for up to 3 days after someone’s last drink. Another byproduct that some labs can test for is EtS (ethyl sulfate) which can signal for recent alcohol intake as well.

Both EtG and EtS tests can sometimes be used for court ordered, to see if people are complying with their probation requirements. Some rehab programs also use this test to monitor people in treatment and identify any potential relapses.

Even though EtG and EtS have longer detection windows, there are a few draw backs. The testing can be more costly and may not be widely available as a standard urine screening. It is currently unable to differentiate between ethanol from alcoholic beverages and exposure to alcohol from other products.

In some cases people who have taken over-the counter flu or cold medications and mouthwashes that contain alcohol may end up testing positive for EtG or EtS. Even typical use of other products that contain alcohol such as, body sprays, insecticides and hand sanitizer can sometimes result in a positive EtG/EtS test.

If you need to get a urine alcohol test done give us a call today at (800) 221-4291 or visit our website for more information at http://www.AccreditedDrugTesting.com

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New York City has now announced a law that prohibits many employers, labor organizations, and employment agencies from conducting pre-employment drug testing for marijuana and THC, which is the active ingredient in cannabis. This new law characterizes these drug tests as “an unlawful discriminatory practice.” Unfortunately, there are numerous exceptions that New York City may prohibit on all pre-employment testing for marijuana with some exceptions.

New York City Prohibiting Testing For Marijuana

Testing for THC and marijuana will be permitted for the following employment positions and for the following reasons only:

  • Police/law-enforcement officers;
  • Positions requiring construction safety training or OSHA certifications under New York laws;
  • Positions requiring commercial driver’s licenses;
  • Positions involving the supervision or care of children, medical patients, or vulnerable persons as defined under New York laws;
  • Other positions with potential to significantly impact health or safety as determined under the regulations to be enacted or identified on the website of the department of citywide administrative services;
  • U.S. Department of Transportation required testing;
  • Testing required under federal contracts or grants;
  • Testing required under federal or state statutes; and
  • Testing required under collective bargaining agreements.

New York City New Law

This law prohibiting pre-employment testing for marijuana in New York City, will become effective one year from today 5/13/2020. Therefore, this gives employers, labor organizations and employment agencies operating in New York City one year to review and revise their drug-testing policies and procedures to ensure they are in compliance. In the meantime during this year of transition, employers are wanting to have further guidance in regards to the compliance measures. The New York City Commission on Human Rights should provide these employers with more clarification on what types of employers and employees will be covered.

With all that being said, we are seeing more and more states joining the wave of allowing the use of marijuana. Now that New York City is first to make it law for employers to remove marijuana and THC in their drug policy’s. Many employers will need to have a new policy intact, here at Accredited Drug Testing we can do that for you. We also offer drug testing panels that exclude marijuana and THC. For more information on being in compliance with the new law in New York City give us a call at (800) 221-4291 or visit our website at www.AccreditedDrugTesting.com to get your drug policy revised today!

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Weed Breathalyzer Device

California product developers are in the works of perfecting a marijuana breathalyzer that will be able to determine if someone smoked marijuana before getting behind the wheel. The device will be hypersensitive and can detect whether someone has smoked in the past 2-3 hours. Currently there is no method that police or other law enforcement’s can accurately test a driver for marijuana in current time, meaning if the individual is currently high on marijuana.

Other current blood, breath and urine tests might not be reliable, as many can only determine if a driver was high at some point that day or week, instead of at that very moment, according to USA Today. Law enforcement is becoming more and more aware of the issue.

 In five Michigan counties where a pilot program was recently introduced, police are able to carry handheld devices to test for the presence of drugs in drivers’ saliva. Results are back in about five minutes. But nothing like that has rolled out statewide or nationwide, and it’s unclear how efficient this system really is. And as the laws pertaining to marijuana use continue to loosen across the U.S., it might make you wonder: What are police doing to keep stoned drivers off the roads? Shouldn’t there be one uniform way to test for marijuana?

Weed Device Of The Future?

Right out of Oakland, California a startup company named Hound Labs have invented a hypersensitive breathalyzer to help regulations for public safety. The device will be able to pick up any THC that might be present on a driver’s breath. Hound Labs had their second clinical trial this past February 2019 and the results are promising.

Stated by Hound Labs, “Results from this landmark study confirm – for the first time in a clinical trial – THC is present in breath for two to three hours after smoking, which is the same duration as peak impairment, according to government studies. The trial also concluded that detecting THC in breath for two to three hours requires the capability to measure complex molecules in breath at extraordinarily low levels – to one trillionth of a gram per liter of breath.” Hound Labs’ technology is indeed capable of detecting THC in breath in picograms, or parts per trillion — demonstrating that a portable breathalyzer can capture incredibly low concentrations, the company said.

Hound Labs Weed Breathalyzer

Once everything is finalized for the device this could be a monumental time the public safety regarding marijuana. The device also has other features as well, not only can the device detect current THC but it can also tests a person’s blood-alcohol level, as well. It can also pick up on whether someone has vaporized or eaten a marijuana product. For more details on the device click here to see how it all works.

This could be the device of the future, it is still early in the process but with all the collected data as of today it is more than possible. “We have had a great deal of interest in our breathalyzer from law enforcement and employers in the U.S., and across the globe,” Hound Labs says online. “(We) continue to receive new inquiries regularly. … We have tested versions of the Hound marijuana breathalyzer with law enforcement as part of the development of the tool. Multiple law enforcement agencies are planning to use our breathalyzer when it becomes available.”

We are excited for a new ventures in the drug testing industry, for any questions or if you would like schedule a drug test visit our website at www.AccreditedDrugTesting.com or give us a call at (800) 221-4291.

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Urine Testing

Urine drug testing is the method most used by employers and law enforcement agencies. Urine is tested for the parent compound of various drugs, as well as their metabolites. Most commonly, in a job setting usually checks for amphetamines, cocaine, marijuana, opiates, nicotine and alcohol.

A urine drug test screening is quick, convenient, and quite accurate. Even after the effects of the drug has worn off, urine is still capable of detecting its presence. Drug testing timelines do vary depending on what type of drug it is.  The number of metabolites in your urine may increase and decrease which can lead to different results within the drug testing detection window.

How do I take a urine drug test?

To take a urine test, you will simply have to urinate within a specimen cup. The administrator will let you know how much urine is needed. Most drug tests will require at least 45 milliliters of urine. This is to ensure that there’s enough sample for the testing. It also makes sure that the specimen belongs to the right individual.

Urine Testing Detection Times

There are many factors that can play a role in the time length that a test can detect certain drugs in the body. Some of those factors are:

-Body Mass

-Hydration Levels

-The acidity of the urine

-How long ago a person took the drug

-How often the person took the drug

If someone uses a drug frequently or heavily, a urine test will detect the drug for a longer period of time. For example, the detection time for marijuana depends on how often someone may use it:

This table can show the average detection times for other drugs that may be tested in a Urine test:

Drug Detection Times

 If a person is taking any prescription medications, over-the-counter medicines, herbal remedies or supplements, it is best to advise your test provider. That way the MRO (Medical Review Officer) can validate the results.

If you need a test, choose the best! Be sure to visit our website www.AccreditedDrugTesting.com and schedule a urine drug test the same day or give us a call at (800) 221-4291.

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Can You Fail a Drug Test For Alcohol?

The plain and simple answer is yes.  If a particular drug testing panel contains alcohol as a marker, it is possible you may fail a drug test for alcohol.  Oftentimes employers and individual’s think of drugs and alcohol as one in the same.  In fact, both substances have the ability to cause impairment of a person’s mental, physical abilities, cause long-term health issues, and can foster unsafe situations.

Due to the abuse of alcohol and its long-term impact on public safety, society, addiction and health problems, it is common for employers to establish a drug-free workplace testing program that includes both drug and alcohol testing.

Concerns regarding substance abuse and addiction concerns is sweeping the nation and various companies may choose to implement alcohol testing as a deterrent and promote safe and healthy working environments. For this reason, one common question many employers and employees have regarding workplace alcohol and drug tests is, “Does alcohol show up in a drug test?” Let’s find out .

Does Alcohol Show Up In a Drug Test?

As we take a deeper look at if alcohol will show up in a drug test, we find several options.  It is important to note that a standard drug test does not test for alcohol.  However, alcohol can be included in a drug test if specifically requested. Thus, if you’re interested in testing employees or individuals for both drugs and alcohol, simply consult with your drug testing provider to determine what type of program best meets your needs.

How Can An Employer Test For Alcohol In The Workplace?

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) recommends testing at the very minimum of the 5 most commonly abused drugs: (amphetamines, THC, cocaine, opiates, and phencyclidine (PCP) as well as alcohol. As stated previously, a standard drug test does not evaluate the presence of alcohol in a person’s system, but many companies elect to include alcohol in their written drug-free workplace policy.  The most common form of alcohol testing is a breath alcohol test; however, urine, saliva or hair testing options are available as well. In addition, with the current climate of the opioid epidemic, many companies are requesting their drug test include additional drugs beyond the standard five mentioned above (e.g., adding synthetic opioids and ecstasy).

Which Alcohol Test Is Right For Me?

Let’s dig a little deeper and determine if alcohol will show up in a drug test?  If you plan to test for alcohol, it is important to understand the different testing methods available and the amount of time that alcohol is detectable in the human body.

In hair, alcohol is present for up to 90 days. In blood or oral fluid, it is present for 12-24 hours. Finally, in urine alcohol can be present for 6-80 hours (depending on the method used for testing).

The two most common ways an employer can test for the presence of alcohol are through breath and saliva tests:

Breath: This method is the most common method for alcohol testing in the workplace.  Breathalyzer is the brand name of the original device and is the one of testing methods that provides a real time result and will measure impairment.  The Department of Transportation (DOT) has established strict requirements for the devices used to perform breath alcohol tests.  All devices used for DOT alcohol testing must be on the Conforming Products List of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.  We recommend that employers or individuals only utilize devices that meet these high standards.

Saliva: This detection method detects the presence of ethanol, a by-product of beer, wine, and spirits. Although slightly more expensive than urine tests, saliva tests are easy to perform and can also detect alcohol ingested within the past day or two.

Finally, blood, hair and urine tests are most often used in forensic, legal and civil testing but infrequently in the workplace.

For more information call us today, 800-221-4291

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Authorities In Dallas Texas Seize Hundreds of Pounds of Methamphetamine and Cocaine

March 4, 2016
Authorities in the Dallas-Fort Worth Texas area have been busy recently, taking more than 50 people into custody on methamphetamine Drug testing centers Dallasdistribution conspiracy charges. Several members of the methamphetamine drug ring were sentenced in December after being arrested for their crimes that date back to 2013.

A surgence of methamphetamine plagued the Dallas-fort Worth area dating back to 2013. Methamphetamine has become a real problem in the area because of its proximity to Mexico. Federal authorities are still apprehending suspects to try and keep the illegal drugs off the streets.

Methamphetamine, also known as meth, crystal meth, crystal, and ice, is an incredibly addictive stimulant closely related to amphetamine. Meth alters the dopamine levels in the mind that gives users a euphoric rush feeling that builds dependency, and easily becomes addictive. Chronic use can lead to substantial brain damage. Meth can be easily detected in a 5-panel drug screening.

Most the methamphetamines distributed in the United States are manufactured in labs in Mexico. These “superlabs” are usually linked to the Mexican drug cartels, that are responsible for heinous crimes across North America. Most ingredients made to use meth are inexpensive and can be bought over the counter, making its accessibility incredibly easy.  The levels of toxicity from the production of methamphetamines can remain in the environment for a long time, causing health issues for those around the area.  

Pharmacies and other retail stores are taking action to prevent abuse of the ingredients used to make methamphetamine, by limiting supplies of products known to make meth. Lawmakers are also taking action against distributors with increased prison sentencing ranging from 10 to 30, or even more years of incarceration.

Due to Dallas-Fort Worth’s proximity to Mexico, authorities have seen an increased amount of methamphetamine related issues.  

With drug and alcohol testing centers throughout the Dallas-Fort Worth area, Accredited Drug Testing Inc. is available to answer all of your drug and alcohol testing questions and needs. For more information contact:

Andrew Gormally
Marketing/Industry Relations Assistant
Andrew@accredtiteddrugtesting.com
https://accrediteddrugtesting.net/
(800) 221-4291
Accredited Drug Testing Inc
Health Screening USA Inc

Related Article: http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2015/12/08/methamphetamine-distribution-conspirators-from-dfw-sentenced/

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Having Problems Quitting Smoking? Heavy Drinking May Be The Reason.

5/4/16

Quitting Smoking

A small study of Polish men revealed that people that are alcohol dependent process nicotine in their bodies quickly, making it harder for them to quit.

In 2011 and 2012, the researchers studied 22 white male smokers at an inpatient alcohol addiction treatment center in Poland. They analyzed participants’ urine samples to gauge nicotine levels and metabolism at one, four and seven weeks after detoxing from alcohol.

“We didn’t measure what was happening when people were drinking, but after they stopped, their elevated rate of nicotine metabolism slowly subsided,” said lead author Noah R. Gubner of the Center for tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, San Francisco.

“When nicotine metabolism is higher, people tend to have a harder time quitting smoking,” Gubner stated. The speed of nicotine processing declined by about half over the seven-week period, even though the men did not change how many cigarettes they were smoking per day.

The results might be useful for helping recovering alcoholics quit smoking, they add. More research is needed to know if nicotine replacement therapy is more effective after people stop heavy drinking, however. The researchers write in Drug and Alcohol Dependence that heavy alcohol use may trigger the enzyme in the body primarily responsible for metabolizing nicotine. And faster nicotine processing could explain the poor rates of quitting smoking among people who are alcohol dependent.
Quitting alcohol and quitting smoking are complicated undertakings, and nicotine and alcohol could have some synergistic effects on reward and pleasure, Gubner said. Also, heavy drinking can affect decision-making, including the decision to smoke less or not at all.
With drug and alcohol testing centers throughout the entire state of United States, Accredited Drug Testing Inc. is available to answer all of your drug and alcohol testing questions and needs. For more information contact:

Andrew Gormally
Marketing/Industry Relations Assistant
Andrew@accredtiteddrugtesting.com
https://accrediteddrugtesting.net/
(800) 221-4291
Accredited Drug Testing Inc
Health Screening USA Inc

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Methamphetamine Drug Use On The Rise

Nov 8 2016

Methamphetamine Drug Use On The Rise

Billings Montana – Methamphetamines (Meth) has overtaken marijuana as the most common drug found in addition to alcohol in DUI samples sent to the state crime lab this past year.

Meth has also been detected more frequently in other types cases handled by Crime lab’s toxicology division, per a summary report from the Montana Department of Justice’s Forensic Science Division.

“I think that’s the real take-home of this summary, is the massive increase in methamphetamine,” said Scott Larson, toxicology supervisor at the crime lab.

Even after the spike in Methamphetamine positive results, alcohol remains the most frequent substance found in DUI toxicology cases.

For example, in 2015, alcohol was the only substance detected in 2,277 out of 3,380 total DUI cases tested calendar year.

The lab had 294 DUI cases involving meth, and the drug concentration of the samples screened increased 123 percent. These numbers are up from 2011, when state toxicologists administered 73 DUI samples that tested positive for meth.

These results illustrate that Marijuana used to be the most common substance after alcohol discovered in DUI blood tests. However, in 2015, meth became more prevalent in DUI blood tests, as per the lab.

The toxicology division of the state crime lab in Missoula also performs postmortem drug screens for medical examiners and examines drug and alcohol test results for cases that involve drug-endangered children. The lab also examines urine tests for the Department of Corrections on inmates and individuals on probation.

The lab analyses specimens for a variety of different drugs — such as marijuana, prescription narcotics, hallucinogens and inhalants. Over the years the overall number of positive drug findings has decreased.

DUIs continue to make up the largest caseload which account for more over half of the 6,139 cases handled in 2015. In most DUI test results, alcohol is the only substance present in the blood sample.

However, meth has increased in other test areas. One area includes postmortem drug screens, in 2011 the lab had 20 confirmed positive cases for meth but the rate has increased to 73 positive cases out of a total 801 cases in 2015.

The study also showed that Urine tests conducted on probationers and parolees have seen a dramatic spike in positive results in regards to meth.

For example, there were 1,192 urinalysis cases handled by the lab in 2015 and more than 550 turned up positive for meth. In 2011 there were fewer than 200 confirmed cases and no other drug has spiked so rapidly.

Amphetamines are classified as a stimulant and an appetite suppressant that targets the central nervous system by increasing the release of certain chemicals (“neurotransmitters”) in the brain.

Amphetamines are a Schedule II drug that can be prescribed for the treatment of narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Physical symptoms may include restlessness, tremors, rapid breathing, confusion, panic and seizures. Due to its high risk for potential for abuse and addiction, physicians prefer using other treatment methods. Common trade names of amphetamine-containing drugs are Adderall®, Dexedrine® and Vyvanse®.
Methamphetamine, often referred to as meth, crystal, crank and ice, is an extremely addictive stimulant drug. Meth can be taken orally, smoked, snorted, or dissolved in water or alcohol and injected.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, even small amounts of methamphetamine can cause increased physical activity, decreased appetite, increased respiration, rapid heart rate, irregular heartbeat and increased blood pressure.

Methamphetamine is also available by prescription for limited medical uses (treatment of obesity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) under the trade name of Desoyxn®.

See Article


For information regarding the effects of drug abuse – Click Here
For  information on a drug free work place – Click Here
For  information on substance abuse programs – Click Here
For information on DOT Drug / Alcohol Testing requirements – Click Here
 

John Burgos, CPC
Business Development Manager
https://accrediteddrugtesting.net
(800) 221-4291
Accredited Drug Testing Inc
Health Screening USA Inc

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What to expect when expecting-the effects of alcohol and drug abuse?

Using drugs or drinking alcohol any time in life but especially while pregnant can create several health issues for both the mother and unborn child.

Some examples are an increased risk of stillbirth and miscarriage which are just two of the harsher examples of the potential complications faced by pregnant women that may be already struggling with substance abuse.

Regardless of the negative consequences and all the research to substantiate theses harsh facts, many continue to use these harmful substances regardless. Here are some astonishing numbers to illustrate the ongoing issue:

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) from 2012-2013, approximately 10% of pregnant women in the U.S. reported drinking alcohol and, though much of it is done to manage other health conditions, it’s increasingly more common for women to continue using medications while carrying a child.

What are Side Effects of Taking Drugs While Pregnant

Alcohol

No matter how small the amount of alcohol consumed during pregnancy can cause a negative impact on the mother and unborn child.  According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism any amount of drinking is considered at risk alcohol use throughout pregnancy.

The consumption of alcohol may:

  • Increase your risk of miscarriage and
  • may result in several development issues in your child like fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or
  • Alcohol related birth defects

It is important that society understands that there is no safe level of alcohol consumption during pregnancy, however, many pregnant women continue to consume at least some amount alcohol with the belief that a small number of drinks will be safe. This is not the case, in fact, half a million children are exposed to alcohol in utero each year.1

Cigarettes

Cigarettes contain harmful chemicals that can damage the health of the smoker and damage the brain of a developing fetus.  The chemicals can limit the amount of oxygen being received by the fetus and the impact of nicotine on a developing baby is greater than the impact on the mother. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, nicotine concentration is up to 15% higher in the baby’s blood than the mother’s.5

Exposing your unborn child to the tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke can also result in many health issues after birth, including:

  • respiratory issues,
  • cerebral palsy,
  • problems with eyesight and
  • possible issues with hearing.

Cocaine

The use of cocaine at any time is harmful but imagine the impact you are having on your unborn child.  Women that use or abuse cocaine oftentimes have poor nutrition and inadequate prenatal care. Oftentimes, cocaine users tend to use the drug in combination with other substances such as alcohol, which makes it more difficult to determine precisely which substance is responsible for the harmful effects on the fetus.5

Heroin

Using heroin while pregnant, will increase the chance of bleeding, especially during your third trimester, as well as preeclampsia (severe high blood pressure).1 This will also place your unborn child at risk for premature birth, dangerously low birth weight, and possibly death. Illicit drug use of any kind, specially heroin will also significantly increase your baby’s risk of developing neonatal abstinence syndrome shortly after birth as well as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), commonly referred to as crib death.

Marijuana

Marijuana can be harmful and should be avoided when trying to conceive, during pregnancy, and while breastfeeding.1,5 Although there is limited data on how marijuana can affect a developing fetus, several studies indicate that using marijuana may be associated with impaired fetal development, rare forms of cancer, premature birth, and low body weight at birth.

MDMA (Ecstasy)

Research has shown that  fetal MDMA exposure during the first trimester may lead to long-term memory problems and impaired learning along with movement and coordination problems in the child.5 There have also been cases where babies exposed to MDMA while in utero developed cardiovascular anomalies and musculoskeletal problems.

Methamphetamines (Meth)

If a fetus is exposed to meth, this can results in long term health issues which may include, increased depression, anxiety, and social isolation have been reported in children exposed to meth in the womb.5 Some studies also suggest that meth use during pregnancy may be associated with congenital abnormalities, such as gastroschisis—a structural defect that can result in a baby being born with their intestines outside of the abdominal wall.

Painkillers

Expectant mothers should be cautious when taking these medication during pregnancy, even if these medications were prescribed by your physician. Opioids are commonly  refereed to as painkillers can be harmful to your developing fetus. A fetus exposed to Opioid painkillers may be linked to excessive fluid in your baby’s brain, abdominal wall defects, glaucoma, and congenital heart defects.

Since many painkillers are chemically similar to heroin, the mother and child can experience many of the same risks. Children may be born with NAS, experiencing painful withdrawal symptoms after birth

For more information call us today at (800)-224-4291 or to click the blue button below schedule a Drug or Alcohol Test Today!

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References:

  1. Forray, A. (2016). Substance use during pregnancy. F1000Research, 5(F1000 Faculty Rev), 887.
  2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2014). Results from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015). Medications and Pregnancy: Treating for Two.
  4. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (2013). Tobacco, Alcohol, Drugs, and Pregnancy.
  5. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2016). Substance Use in Women.
  6. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2012). Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment: A Research-Based Guide.
  7. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2016). DrugFacts: Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction.
  8. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2015). Detoxification and Substance Abuse Treatment.